A Guide To Our Rankings: How We Picked our Top Choice

After and intense research, consultations with numerous customers interviewed, we found the following 5 products that became our top picks. We chose these three based on the following factors:

Evaluation Criteria

Ease of use

Affordability / Value 

Taste / Easy to Ingest

Impressive results

Clearly labeled ingredients

Selection of Probiotics 

Company Reputation

The Top Probiotic Supplement For Digestive & Gut Health in 2020

Good health starts in the gut, but are you taking proper care of yours?

One of the most often overlooked parts of our well-being is our digestive system, better known as our “gut health”.

Gut health is all about keeping the ratio of good living bacteria in your digestive organs higher than the bad bacteria.

It’s estimated that as much as 1% to 3% of your body weight is made up of microbial inhabitants, which include fungi, bacteria, and other microscopic cells that have a “symbiotic” (mutually-beneficial) relationship with your body.

If the bad overtake the good it can compromise your immune system.

How do you combat those pesky bad bacteria in your gut?

Well, you don’t have to look far these days to find information about “Probiotics” floating around whether on TV, in magazines, or on blogs and videos online.

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeast that can help restore a thriving colony of good bacteria in your digestive system and they help keep your gut healthy, so your immune system can fight off intruders and you can enjoy well-being.

Top Probiotic Supplements of 2020

Best Product Overall

9 Hours Researched

3 Experts Consulted

20 customers Interviewed

by Primal Harvest[1]

1533 Reviews

Primal Probiotics

Made in the USA

Potent Probiotic Strains

Patented PreforPro® Prebiotics

Money Back Guarantee

Ultimate Synbiotic supplement

2,982 people chose this today

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1. Primal Probiotics

by Primal Harvest[1]

TOTAL RANKING

1533 votes

9.6/10

Ingredient Quality Control

Potency & Estimated Efficacy

Price / Customer Value

Return Policy

Overall Customer Happiness

9.6/10

9.7/10

9.4/10

9.5/10

9.7/10

PROS

CONS

Made in the USA, FDA and GMP certified facility


"No questions asked" 90-day Money-Back-Guarantee


Contains 12 dynamic most effective probiotic strains. Perfect for immune boost and gut health

Contains revolutionary and patented PreforPro® prebiotic


Independent Testing done by a Third-Party Lab


Contains LactoSpore®  strains with powerful anti-inflammatory properties

Only Available Online




Sometimes runs out of Stock

The Bottom Line

Primal Probiotics are formulated to combat harmful bacteria within your gut while at the same time ensuring that the good bacteria has room to flourish. This is achieved by a careful combination of the most potent Probiotic strains like LactoSpore®, Bifidobacterium and other strains in combination with a prebiotic PreforPro® coctail. These potent probiotic strains are extremely effective at boosting immune support and fending off the flu.

We have no doubt at all about its quality and efficacy. Backed by scientific research, top-notch ingredients and the 90-day money-back guarantee on it, we are confident our #1 pick is the only probiotic supplement needed. 

You'll get a highly effective supplement that will supply your gut's microbiome with all the bacteria, probiotics & prebiotics that you will need. And be rest assured, they independently tested by a third-party lab for quality and efficiency.

Primal Probiotics pricing stands out, especially when you buy multiple bottles. The price drops dramatically and since continued use over months is recommended to achieve the best benefits, buying a 3-6 month supply is a no-brainer.

There’s just a small thing: they get sold out really fast. So we recommend you hurry and place your order if you are now assured that this will be beneficial to your health.

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2. Probiotic p3-OM

by Bioptimizers

B+ Rating

PROS

CONS

Made in the USA


Formulated to fight excess gas build-up

365 Day Money Back Guarantee 


Vegetable Capsules

Instructed to take 8 pills a day. 2 with every meal and 2 before bed. This means the bottle will only last one week.


Only contains Lactobacillus Plantarum OM

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TOTAL RANKING

215 votes

8.4/10

Ingredient Quality Control

Potency & Estimated Efficacy

Price / Customer Value

Return Policy

Overall Customer Happiness

8.6/10

7.9/10

9.1/10

8.0/10

8.4/10

3. Mood+

by Garden of Life

C+ Rating

PROS

CONS

Organic Ashwagandha & Alaskan Blueberries

50 Billion CFU & 16 Probiotics 


70% Organic Materials 

Bold Claims about Emotional Health & Stress Management

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TOTAL RANKING

567 votes

7.7/10

Ingredient Quality Control

Potency & Estimated Efficacy

Price / Customer Value

Return Policy

Overall Customer Happiness

7.9/10

7.4/10

8.6/10

7.2/10

7.7/10

Product is Often Damaged in transit

Best Probiotic of 2020

Latest update: April 3, 2020

Latest Reviews

Unique Features

Comparisons

Costs & More

When it comes to our gut health, it’s very important to be clear and understand what we are consuming and how to help us with better digestion.

Proper digestion helps us absorb all the correct nutrients and minerals we need.

 The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics defines “probiotics” as “live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host”.

Probiotics are composed of microorganisms. These microorganisms are mainly bacteria but also include yeasts.

Always remember that these healthy bacteria are naturally present in fermented foods, may be added to other food products, and are available as dietary supplements.

Thanks to countless scientific studies, Probiotics have proven to result in a wide range of health benefits.

Surrounding probiotics there are some key definitions and important terms to know:

Prebiotics: A type of fiber that the human body cannot digest. They serve as food for probiotics (i.e. fruits, vegetables, and whole grains).

Probiotics: Are tiny living microorganisms, including bacteria and yeast. They occur in many fermented foods, (including yogurt, sauerkraut, and Tempeh).

Symbiotic: Commercial products containing both prebiotic sugars and probiotic organisms that beneficially affect the host by improving the survival and implantation of live microbial dietary supplements in the gastrointestinal tract.

Probiotics are Identified by their Specific Strain

Each strain includes the genus, the species, the subspecies (if applicable), and an alphanumeric strain designation.

The seven core genera of microbial organisms most often used in probiotic products are:

  1. Lactobacillus
  2. Bifidobacterium
  3. Saccharomyces
  4. Streptococcus
  5. Enterococcus
  6. Escherichia
  7. Bacillus

Probiotics are available as dietary supplements (in capsules, powders, liquids, and other forms) containing a wide variety of strains and doses.

Each product contains mixed cultures of live microorganisms rather than single strains.

Many organizations have systematically reviewed the available evidence and developed recommendations on specific probiotics—including appropriate product, dose, and formulation—to use for preventing or treating various health conditions.

Probiotics are measured in Colony Forming Units (CFU)

CFU’s indicate the number of viable cells. Amounts may be written on product labels as, for example, 1 x 109 for 1 billion CFU or 1 x 1010 for 10 billion CFU.

Many probiotic supplements contain 1 to 10 billion CFU per dose, but some products contain up to 50 billion CFU or more.

However, higher CFU counts do not necessarily improve the product’s health effects.

In the end what really matters is the type of probiotic strains and the CFU of those individual strains

Probiotics & Digestive Health: 7 Signs You Need Probiotics

  1. You are taking antibiotics: Including pain medication and anti-inflammatory medications in the last 5 years, which destroy a lot of good gut bacteria.

  2. You’ve had food poisoning: Food poisoning destroys your healthy bacteria while the bad bacteria moves in and sets up camp. If you have never repopulated your good bacteria after food poisoning, chances are your health will suffer.

  3. You have an unhappy digestive system: Perhaps your gut is always angry. You might suffer from stomach pain, constipation, diarrhea, or food intolerance. Any of these things can be a sign that you don't have enough healthy bacteria in your stomach.

  4. You have skin condition: Chronic dry skin eczema or even just dull and listless skin can be a true sign that you do not have enough healthy bacteria your gut.

  5. You get sick often: Does it seem like you go from one cool to another and can never seem to stay well? That’s an indication that your immune system is compromised and your gut is not healthy.

  6. You have a yeast overgrowth: Any kind of issue with yeast is a sign that you do not have enough good bacteria in your digestive tract.

  7. You are depressed: 95% of serotonin, the happy hormone, is made in your gut. If your gut is unhappy and full of bad bacteria you won't have enough serotonin. Once you get your gut back where it needs to be you will find your mood improving and your outlook change.

The Right Strains To Look For In Probiotic Supplements:

  • Various Strains – The more strains of Probiotic bacteria your supplement has, the better.

These are the strains you need to look for:

  • Lactobacillus Acidophilus – Studies have found L. Acidophilus to be helpful with Diarrhea,Bloating, and Bowel Pain. It even helps with Allergies and keeping your immune system strong enough to fend off Cold and Flu.

  • Bifidobacterium Lactis – Can help with Constipation, as it may help promote regular bowel movements. Other studies have described B. Lactis as a “health-promoting” strain that may be helpful with food allergies and even respiratory ailments.

  • Lactobacillus Casei – studied for possible positive effects on people with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

  • Bacillus Coagulans – B. Coagulans has also been found to be helpful for people with abdominal pain from Irritable Bowels. Other placebo-controlled trials have found B. Coagulans effective at reducing gas and gastrointestinal distress.

Must Haves:

More Than One Strain
High Efficacy Bacteria
Contains Prebiotics
Fair Price
Customer Service & Return Policy
Made in USA, Following FDA & GMP Guidelines
Independent Testing by 3rd Party Lab

What To Avoid:

Trying to select the cheapest

Trusting False Reviews

Not Enough Research 


False claims


Relying JUST on CFU numbers

Our Criteria For Selecting The Best Probiotics:

4. Ultimate Flora Probiotic

by RenewLife

C Rating

PROS

CONS

Delayed-Release Capsules


Made in the USA


Low Entry Price Point

Poor Quality Control - Products Sometimes Arrive Already Expired 

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TOTAL RANKING

567 votes

7.6/10

Ingredient Quality Control

Potency & Estimated Efficacy

Price / Customer Value

Return Policy

Overall Customer Happiness

7.2/10

7.3/10

7.7/10

7.1/10

7.3/10

5. Pro-15 Probiotics

by Hyberbiotics

C Rating

PROS

CONS

Take Only Once a Day


Sensitive Stomach Friendly


Easy to Swallow

Some Users Reported Prolonged Periods of Diarrhea

Click to Shop Now
TOTAL RANKING

567 votes

7.5/10

Ingredient Quality Control

Potency & Estimated Efficacy

Price / Customer Value

Return Policy

Overall Customer Happiness

7.1/10

7.2/10

7.3/10

6.9/10

7./10

What Exactly Are Probiotics?

WARNING: DO NOT Confuse Probiotics & Prebiotics

How To Understand Your Options With Probiotics

ADVERTORIAL

HOW WE RANK
Advertiser Disclosure

© 2020 Smarter-Choices.com. 
All Rights Reserved. 

Trademarks utilized on our website belong to their respective owners and no implied or expressed endorsement of our website or services is intended. Rankings can be affected by the relationship Smarter Choices has with our top picks.

[1] we have a financial relationship with some of our top picks and partners

*These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA Food & Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. The information provided by this website or this company is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with your physician and should not be construed as individual medical advice. The testimonials on this website are individual cases and do not guarantee that you will get the same results. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this web site is for general information purposes only. 

CITATIONS

Office of Dietary Supplements. (2020). Probiotics. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Probiotics-HealthProfessional/#en1

National Institutes of Health. (2012). NIH Human Microbiome Project defines normal bacterial makeup of the body. Retrieved from https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-human-microbiome-project-defines-normal-bacterial-makeup-body

Terry, N., & Margolis, K. G. (2017). Serotonergic Mechanisms Regulating the GI Tract: Experimental Evidence and Therapeutic Relevance. Handbook of experimental pharmacology, 239, 319–342. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5526216/

Ringel-Kulka, T., Palsson, O. S., Maier, D., Carroll, I., Galanko, J. A., Leyer, G., & Ringel, Y. (2011). Probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium lactis Bi-07 versus placebo for the symptoms of bloating in patients with functional bowel disorders: a double-blind study. Journal of clinical gastroenterology, 45(6), 518–525. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21436726/

Sinn, D. H., Song, J. H., Kim, H. J., Lee, J. H., Son, H. J., Chang, D. K., Kim, Y. H., Kim, J. J., Rhee, J. C., & Rhee, P. L. (2008). Therapeutic effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus-SDC 2012, 2013 in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Digestive diseases and sciences, 53(10), 2714–2718. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/18274900/

Sazawal, S., Hiremath, G., Dhingra, U., Malik, P., Deb, S., & Black, R. E. (2006). Efficacy of probiotics in prevention of acute diarrhoea: a meta-analysis of masked, randomised, placebo-controlled trials. The Lancet. Infectious diseases, 6(6), 374–382. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16728323/

Ouwehand, A. C., Nermes, M., Collado, M. C., Rautonen, N., Salminen, S., & Isolauri, E. (2009). Specific probiotics alleviate allergic rhinitis during the birch pollen season. World journal of gastroenterology, 15(26), 3261–3268. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19598302/

Leyer, G. J., Li, S., Mubasher, M. E., Reifer, C., & Ouwehand, A. C. (2009). Probiotic effects on cold and influenza-like symptom incidence and duration in children. Pediatrics, 124(2), e172–e179. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/19651563/

Zhao, Y., & Yu, Y. B. (2016). Intestinal microbiota and chronic constipation. SpringerPlus, 5(1), 1130. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4951383/

Liu, Q., Jing, W., Wang, W. (2018). Bifidobacterium lactis Ameliorates the Risk of Food Allergy in Chinese Children by Affecting Relative Percentage of Treg and Th17 Cells. Retrieved from https://www.hindawi.com/journals/cjidmm/2018/4561038/

Singh, A., Hacini-Rachinel, F., Gosoniu, M. L., Bourdeau, T., Holvoet, S., Doucet-Ladeveze, R., Beaumont, M., Mercenier, A., & Nutten, S. (2013). Immune-modulatory effect of probiotic Bifidobacterium lactis NCC2818 in individuals suffering from seasonal allergic rhinitis to grass pollen: an exploratory, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. European journal of clinical nutrition, 67(2), 161–167. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23299716/

Alipour, B., Homayouni-Rad, A., Vaghef-Mehrabany, E., Sharif, S. K., Vaghef-Mehrabany, L., Asghari-Jafarabadi, M., Nakhjavani, M. R., & Mohtadi-Nia, J. (2014). Effects of Lactobacillus casei supplementation on disease activity and inflammatory cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a randomized double-blind clinical trial. International journal of rheumatic diseases, 17(5), 519–527. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24673738/

Rogha, M., Esfahani, M. Z., & Zargarzadeh, A. H. (2014). The efficacy of a synbiotic containing Bacillus Coagulans in treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized placebo-controlled trial. Gastroenterology and hepatology from bed to bench, 7(3), 156–163. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4129566/

Jäger, R., Purpura, M., Farmer, S., Cash, H. A., & Keller, D. (2018). Probiotic Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086 Improves Protein Absorption and Utilization. Probiotics and antimicrobial proteins, 10(4), 611–615. Retrieved from https://bit.ly/2zJXxpi